The Fine Line, part 4, by guest essayist Amy Fernaays

Active Duty (album)

Active Duty (album) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

HONOLULU (May 22, 2010) Sailors from various c...

HONOLULU (May 22, 2010) Sailors from various commands march on Kalakaua Ave. during the Aloha to the Military Ohana celebration and parade. The event was organized to honor active duty military, reservists, wounded warriors, military retirees and veterans of other campaigns and was hosted by the United Service Organization Hawaii, BAE Systems, TriWest Health Care Alliance and the City and County of Honolulu. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Mark Logico/Released) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Besides his family, the reservists’ has the added worry concerning his job. In our economic climate today, it is very possible that his job could be phased out or the company could close. Many National Guardsmen work for fire departments, police, and in hospital; which can cause a hardship for a small community when a unit is called up. (Jim Garmone 2004)
“’Large corporations have the depth to absorb a year-long loss of personnel,’ Said a state Guard official. ‘Smaller companies do not.’ Some companies have continued the Guardsmen’s medical coverage. Still others have made up the difference between the Guardsmen’s civilian pay and their military salaries.” states Garmone.
Some reservists’ take a pay cut when they are activated because their civilian salary is not connected to their military pay. The soldier must be prepared for the loss of certain income, benefits, retirement contributions and other investments.
Even though reservists are worried about their jobs, and benefits the Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Rights Act of 1994 (USERRA) does try to protect reservists. Judy Greenwald reports, “’Typically, the employer must reinstate within two weeks of the application for re-employment,’ Ms. Farmer said. ‘If there’s been several years of active duty the regulations recognize that it may take a little bit more time because you have to open up a position, which can mean laying off another employee or transferring someone else.’”

English: Camp Shelby, Miss. (April 7, 2006) - ...

English: Camp Shelby, Miss. (April 7, 2006) – A combination of Navy reserve and active duty Sailors attached to Navy Embedded Training Team Lima receive weapons training from soldiers at Camp Shelby. The reservists taking part in the training were activated by Navy Expeditionary Logistics Support Group in Williamsburg, Va., for an upcoming deployment to Afghanistan. U.S. Navy photo by Journalist Seaman Matthew D. Leistikow (RELEASED) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Judy Greenwald discloses, “Thousands of veterans could return to the workforce given President Barack Obama’s commitment to withdraw 23,000 troops from Afghanistan by the end of the summer and his plan to turn security entirely over to the Afghan government by 2014.”
This could spell trouble for businesses because some issues have already surfaced. One of those problems is that the USERRA is ambiguous in its wording. As troops begin returning home; reservists wishing to return to their civilian jobs are faced with employers unprepared to re-instate them. (Greenwald 2012)
Judy Greenwald asserts, “’Employers have to pay close attention to deadlines regarding how soon they have to bring the veterans back, which depends on factors including the length of time the service member was deployed and whether he or she was injured,’ said Shannon D. Farmer, a partner with law firm Ballard Spahr L.L. P. in Philadelphia.
It may seem that this act favors veteran’s and be a hardship for businesses, but this act doesn’t help veteran’s if there job has been completely phased out due to the recession or if the company has shut down. For a reservists income is only obtained through employment. Once they are out-processed from their active duty tour their income, and benefits come from a civilian job. This puts a large amount of stress on a returning soldier to become re-employed as quickly as possible. Knowing that you will have to fight for your job after spending a year fighting for your country is a hard pill to swallow for most reservists.

English: Fort Jackson, S.C. (March 23, 2006) -...

English: Fort Jackson, S.C. (March 23, 2006) – The Executive Officer of Fleet Industrial Supply Center Det 206, Lt.Cdr. Gordon Jones, leads Navy Reservists and active duty personnel in an urban warfare-training scenario during an Individual Augmentee Training Course at the McCrady Training Center. The Sailors are conducting training prior to deploying in support of the global war on terrorism. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer’s Mate 1st Class Timm Duckworth (RELEASED) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

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